11 Aug

Part 3: Perinatal Nursing & Technology

Rebecca Cypher, PeriGen Chief Nursing OfficerPart 3:
Perinatal Nursing & Technology
Time to Accept & Embrace the Challenge

by Rebecca Cypher, MSN, PNNP
Chief Nursing Officer, PeriGen

I hope you enjoyed the first two excerpts from my recent white paper on technologies in perinatal nursing. This article, done on request by PeriGen (the electronic fetal monitoring software firm for which I serve as Chief Nursing Officer), looks at how technology has evolved in response to changes in perinatal nursing, how we in turn have changed as a result of electronic FHR monitoring, and a view to how we as nursing professionals can influence continued improvement in perinatal technologies.

Below is the final excerpt where we examine the importance of a perinatal nurses view on technology improvements. In case you missed the first two installments, PeriGen has posted the full article as a PDF here.

Why Should Nurses Care?

Between 2008-2012, there were 2.8 million registered nurses (including advanced practice nurses) in the United States workforce making nursing one of the largest health-related professional groups. 24, 29, 30 According to Gallup polls, these professionals are regarded by the public as the most trusted in the United States. Nursing is a caring profession that requires licensure, knowledge and clinical skill. Nursing demonstrates the best side of humanity. Well-designed HIT augments nursing capacity. Nurses must be clear in thinking and understanding the relative strengths and limitations of all parties in order to direct the evolution of these technologies. In turn, nurses can harness these technologies to support the mission of providing high quality patient care that is evidence-based, individualized, efficient and safe.

Government agencies expect a 21% increase in demand for nurses nationwide by 2025 though considerable variation of supply and demand at the state level is anticipated. Nursing employment will continue to be affected by factors including population growth, a shift in demographics as the median age increases, economic conditions, employment and retirement of nursing personnel and changes in health care reimbursement. Workforce projection models demonstrate that the rapidly changing health care delivery system, which includes HIT, is shifting how patient care is delivered and the specific role the nursing workforce plays in these changes. 31

Perinatal nurses are using technology in conjunction with clinical knowledge that has been accumulated through hands on experience and education. This combination assists in improving care and facilitates multidisciplinary communication. Technology allows nurses to ask the right questions at the right time, perform streamlined nursing assessments, accurately determine a correct diagnosis from a multidisciplinary approach, and perform appropriate tasks and intervention on the front and back end of decision-making processes. 32

Conclusion

In this modern era, technology is commonplace whether it’s embedded in households, communication methods, modes of transportation or healthcare. In these areas technology continues to be created, refined and updated on a regular basis. Advances in technology, whether it’s a new cellular phone model or component of medical equipment, are requisite in order to provide and improve efficiency, convenience, accessibility and safety. As nurses provide day to day quality patient care in the perinatal setting, technology will continue to influence many facets of the nursing process framework. In today’s healthcare environment, few perinatal nurses can envision delivering patient care without assistance from some form of technology, whether that technology be an automatic blood pressure machine or fetal surveillance with an electronic fetal monitor. Nursing is what we as individuals do best and nurses working in conjunction with HIT is clearly an investment in optimizing efficiency, perinatal outcomes and patient safety. Throughout time women in labor have sought assistance from others with experience and skills. Clearly nurses will continue to fill that essential role backed by increasingly complex technology as HIT evolves.

To continue reading this article or review the references, please click here